ASHM Report Back

Clinical posts from members and guests of the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM) from various international medical and scientific conferences on HIV, AIDS, viral hepatitis, and sexual health.

Day 3 - Wednesday 16/11/2016 - A.Prof. James. WARD - Aboriginal Health Perspectives

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A.Prof. James. WARD - Aboriginal Health Perspectives.

A Predicted divergence of what is happing in Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islanders community’s in relation to HIV and STI’s.

  

New diagnosis of HIV in remote communities due to young mobile population.

Risk Behaviours such as sharing NSP Equipment, with a background of increasing prevalence of STI’s.

 Failure to engage Treatment as Prevention (PrEP) as need to take other medication (pill burden) for multiple health conditions/comorbidity.

 10-24 years age group, increasing Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea -                                                                  This highlights the inequities and lack of access to care.

 

Hep C – mostly transmitted through injecting drug use (IDU).  

Hep C has increased 43 % in 2011 – 2015.  

It effects the youngest 15-24 years old.

Hep C has 8 times the incidence in Aboriginal people (than non-Aboriginal People).

 

Rural and Remote Communities – need more access to Aboriginal Primary healthcare for testing and treatment and treatment as prevention (PrEP).

HIV in Cairns, QLD – young Aboriginal & Torres Straits Islander men in 2014-2016 had 50 % increase in HIV. This also effects bi-sexual men and men that don't dentify as gay.

NO access to NSP. Difficulties in approach to NSP and harm minimisation.

(Treatment as Prevention) TASP.

Prof. Ward said that we could learn from Canada’s first nation’s people in Saskatchewan that have a background of unresolved grief & intergenerational trauma. 

Increased of IDU and STI’s = HIV !

We need to prevent an outbreak occurring in our rural and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ABSTI) Communities. Health services are already limited and they would also not be able to cope with a major outbreak occurs. This would devastating to these communities.

ABSTI – vulnerability of population.

Need to increase the workforce in meaning work and career options

Need timely surveillance data, to be able to respond quickly    

Medicare to cover costs

Need to advocate ‘outside and ‘raise our voices’ (to Governments and the Australian people to increase awareness and be able to act/prevent). Especially non-Aboriginal People need to stand up and raise their voices about concerns and issues of our ABSTI People.

Increase the current low testing rates for HIV.                                                                                                                                                             Use a diversity/combination of strategies include - strengthen Aboriginal and cultural appropriate Primary care.

 Currently on 32% of people with STI’s are offered HIV Test. This needs to be offered 100%.

 Community itself needs to be interested and engaged.

 

 

 

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