ASHM Report Back

Clinical posts from members and guests of the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM) from various international medical and scientific conferences on HIV, AIDS, viral hepatitis, and sexual health.

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WHO STI Treatment Guidelines 2017

 

Good morning from the 2017 HIV/STI Conference in Rio De Janeiro. There may be a cross over in some topics with other ASHM bloggers but over the course of the congress we will be blogging about different items.

This morning commenced with WHO treatment updates and guidelines, which had not been updated since 2003. The WHO updated guidelines and their objectives focused on ensuring they have international guidelines for the effective treatment of Neisseria Gonorrhoea, Chlamydia Trachomatis and Syphilis.

The majority of all treatment guidelines have already been adopted by Australian STI Management guidelines (STIPU) and are in place, but the key points taken will be outlined below.

* Neisseria Gonorrhoea (Assoc. Prof. Magnus Unemo - Director Swedish Reference Lab) - Dual Therapy (Ceftriaxone 250mg IMI with Azithromycin 1g Oral) recommended in all cases (Ano-Rectal, Oropharyngeal and Genital), unless resistance to Azithromycin is known, then single therapy with Ceftriaxone 250mg or Cefitixime 400mg can be used but again this only in specific cases and specialist advise should be obtained.
NB: STIPU do recommend 500mg Ceftriaxone IMI as do a number of other clinics worldwide. 

- Reinfection is treated again with dual therapy, but consideration could be given to treat with 500mg Ceftriaxone IMI with 2g Azithromycin Orally.

* Chlamydia Trachomatis (Nicola Low - University of Bern)

Guidelines were again similar to what STIPU guidelines in Australia recommend with a strong enforcement around Doxycycline versus Azithromycin in Ano-Rectal cases.

- 1g Azithromycin oral for Uncomplicated genital infections or Doxycycline 100mg Oral twice daily as alertantive treatment.

- Ano Rectal infections, there was a important point about ensuring Doxycycline 100mg BD for 7 days was used as first line treatment, and that Azithromcyin not be used as a treatment option. 

- For LGV, Doxycycline 100mg BD for 21 days is now recommended treatment versus the previous 14 x day treatment. 

- An important change from the 2003 guidelines was that Erythromycin was considered first line treatment in pregnancy, but now Azithromycin is the recommended treatment for women with a Chalmydia infection during pregnancy.

It should also be noted that Nicola Low mentioned there was not enough evidence for Azitrhomycin extra dosing to be used to treat Ano-Rectal Chlamydia as previously done for patients who might have had issues with Doxycline dosing adherence.

Treponema Pallidum (Syphilis) - Dr. Francis Ndowa (Zimbabwe).

Australian STIPU guidelines already reflect current guidelines.

- Early Syphilis -  2.4million units (1.8g) Benazthine Penicillin IMI as a single dose is still recommended as first line treatment or Doxycyclinne oral 100mg BD for 14 x days if there is a Penicillin allergy. 
(NB: Numerous other alternatives given, but not enough information was transcribed to write about)

- Late Syhpilis (>2 years) - 1.8g Benzathine Penicillin IMI as three doses spilt into 3 x weeks (i.e.: Every seven days), which is current to Australian guidelines. 

Genital Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) - Prof. David Lewis - (Australia).

19.2 million new HSV2 diagnoses in 2012 for people aged 15-49 (11.3% Global prevalence)

6 x recomendations which show commence treatment straight away on first initial episode. Evidence showed a reduction in symptoms 2-4 days less than placebo and HSV shedding in 9.2 days
NB: See Brett Hadlow's blog for information around medication dosage recommendations).

For cases under four occurrences a year, treatment again is recommended with a 2.5 day reduction in viral shedding.

For cases over four reoccurrences, repressive therapy is recommended over suppressive and a twice daily dose of Acyclovir (400mg) or 500mg Valaciclovir once daily. Evidence showed less frequent HSV occurrence, and reduced shedding.

Overall it was good to see Australia is working within the WHO guidelines to combat STI prevention and ensure appropriate treatment.

For current Australian STI Guidelines, please see http://www.sti.guidelines.org.au

Photo 1: Blogging in my hotel room with Brett Hadlow looking over Barra Da Tijuca Beach.

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This WHO consultation followed on immediately from the CDC. This was one of the data collection workshops aimed at feeding into the development of the new WHO resistance testing guidelines. I was the only person in the audience from South East Asia and the Western Pacific. But a survey can be completed on line Insert website.

 

What was important here is the trade-off between affordable therapy for most people versus switching (and abandoning 1st line therapy). Willem Venter, from South Africa, cautioned against switching, and introduced the practicality that this would not be affordable, if 85% of people were benefiting from that therapy. Jonathan Shapiro questioned the 15% versus 85% assumption about resistance, and suggested there might need to be more consideration of this.

I raised the issue that there was no-one in the audience from ESA and the Pacific, including Australia. The consultation is open online and I was told consultation would come from the WPRO and SEPRO offices.

 

http://www.who.int/hiv/topics/drugresistance/en/ 

Please join us for a memorial event celebrating the life of one of Australia’s leading HIV advocates, Levinia Crook… https://t.co/N7dof5xaGa

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